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Kailar ve Hz mUhammed sülalsi bağlantısı Tabakat-ı Nasiri den

Kailar (ottoman alfabet قایلر ) is a city in western Rumelia. It lies in the prefecture of Kozana, which is part of Western Macedonia.It is the seat of the province of Manastır.The city was named Kayilar while under Ottoman rule.

Tam ekran yakalama 03.01.2011 044433
Kaialar

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  • Hindistanda Kailar: Kabilin batısı, Keşmir'in doğusuna yakın, Lahor'un kuzeyi

Kailar Map — Satellite Images of Kailar

   original name: Kailar

geographical location: Mirpur, Jammu and Kashmir, India, Asia geographical coordinates: 33° 7' 50" North, 74° 13' 30" East

Welcome to the Kailar google satellite map! This place is situated in Mirpur, Jammu and Kashmir, India, its geographical coordinates are 33° 7' 50" North, 74° 13' 30" East and its original name (with diacritics) is Kailar. See Kailar photos and images from satellite below, explore the aerial photographs of Kailar in India. Kailar hotels map is available on the target page linked above.


Etimology Edit

  • قایلر : in Ottoman alfabet
  • Kailar :writing in latin alfabet in English
  • kayılar or kaylar or kayalar: in modern latin turkish alfabet
  • Ptolemaida: in (Greek in Latin alfabet

Geografi Edit

The city is in the valley and the mountains of Askio to the southwest and Vermio to the northeast. It is located N of Kozani, E of Kastoria, S of Florina and SW of Edessa. Since the 1960s or the 1970s, GR-3/E65? bypassed it to the east.

HistoryEdit

According to archaeologists, the Ptolemaida region has been occupied since 6000 BCE[5].

Ancient timesEdit

Archaeologists, in November of 2005, discovered the remains of two farming villages dating back to the Neolithic period. A press report notes that such farming villages were trading centres and had a "developed knowledge of metalworking"[1].

The city is named after a soldier of Alexander the Great named Ptolemaeus the Lagos, who was a student of Aristotle as well. Many places and cities in western Macedonia were named after soldiers of Alexander the Great. Ptolemaida is also the capital of Eordea province (Eordea means loved, and was taken from the name of the ancient goddess Eorda, or Mother Earth[kaynak belirtilmeli]).

Ottoman timesEdit

During Ottoman rule, Ptolemaida was called Kailari. The area of Ptolemaida became famous for the historic battles in the areas of Komanos and Perdikkas, during the Balkan Wars of 1912-13. Ptolemaida was taken by Greek forces on October 15 1915.

The 1911 Edition of Encyclopaedia Britannica about Yuruks, Kailars and KonariotesEdit

see link

The first Turkish immigration from Asia Minor took place under the Byzantine emperors before the conquest of the country. The first purely Turkish town, Yenije-Vardar, was founded on the ruins of Vardar in 1362. After the capture of Salonica (1430), a strong Turkish population was settled in the city, and similar colonies were founded in Monastir, Ochrida, Serres, Drama and other important places. In many of these towns half or more of the population is still Turkish. A series of military colonies were subsequently established at various points of strategic importance along the principal lines of communication. Before 1360 large numbers of nomad shepherds, or Yuruks, from the district of Konia, in Asia Minor, had settled in the country; their descendants are still known as Konariotes. Further immigration from this region took place from time to time up to the middle of the 18th century. After the establishment of the feudal system in 1397 many of the Seljuk noble families came over from Asia Minor; their descendants may be recognized among the beys or Moslem landowners in southern Macedonia. At the beginning of the 18th century the Turkish population was very considerable, but since that time it has continuously decreased. A low birth rate, the exhaustion of the male population by military service, and great mortality from epidemics, against which Moslem fatalism takes no pre-cautions, have brought about a decline which has latterly been hastened by emigration

The Turkish rural population is found in three principal groups:

  • the most easterly extends from the Mesta to Drama, Pravishta and Orfano, reaching the sea-coast on either side of Kavala, which is partly Turkish, partly Greek.
  • The second, or central group begins on the sea-coast, a little west of the mouth of the Strymon, where a Greek population intervenes, and extends to the north-west along the Kara-Dagh and Belasitza ranges in the direction of Strumnitza, Veles, Shtip and Radovisht.
  • The third, or southern, group is centred around Kailar, an entirely Turkish town, and extends from Lake Ostrovo to Selfije (Servia). The second and third groups are mainly composed of Konariot shepherds. Besides these fairly compact settlements there are numerous isolated Turkish colonies in various parts of the country. The Turkish rural population is quiet, sober and orderly, presenting some of the best characteristics of the race. Apostolos Margaritis 10:44, 2 February 2006 (UTC)--3210 22:50, 19 May 2006 (UTC)

Endustry Edit

It is considered a highly industrial area. There are 4 power plants in this area producing 70% of Greece's electrical power. In its subsoil, there are huge amounts of lignite which is the raw material of the power plants. The plants are owned by the Public Power Corporation (DEI) , who is the major employer in the city. The plant was first tested by the prime minister of Greece at that time, Constantine Karamanlis. The other two are in Amyntaio in Florina and in Agios Dimitrios.

Geografy Edit

The city is in the valley and the mountains of Askio to the southwest and Vermio to the northeast. It is located N of Kozani, E of Kastoria, S of Florina and SW of Edessa. Since the 1960s or the 1970s, GR-3/E65? is bypassed to the east.

The current population is roughly 40,000 and is mainly employed by the power plants.


Ottoman TimesEdit

See main article: Ottoman Greece

According to Ottoman archivies the city was estableshed by turks.

First settlmants of Kailar are below

Dosya:Kayalar ilk meskunları (firs stalments of Kailar).jpg


The Sultan Selim II's ferman for Kailar:


Ptolemaida was called Kailari (from the Turkish word which means relative like kainpeder;father in law -lar makes plural).

The area of Ptolemaida became famous for the historic battles in the areas of Komanos and Perdikkas, during the Balkan Wars of 1912-13. Ptolemaida was taken from Turkish rule on October 15 1915. Ottoman time :original names of villigies of Kailar


Greece Times Edit

Settlement of new populationEdit

In the 1920s, the Pontic refugees from Asia Minor and from Pontos, as well as a smaller number of refugees from Thrace, arrived during the Greco-Turkish War and the population expanded. On September 8 1942, Ptolemaida became a municipality with a population of 8000, whose main occupation was agriculture and livestock farming.

CultureEdit

Ptolemaida's culture has a long history. In addition to the Neolithic archaeological sites, a golden necklace dating to roughly 4500 BCE was discovered by a resident on February 16 2006[1]. Associated Press reporter Costas Kantouris describes the item as a "flat, roughly ring-shaped prehistoric pendant [which] probably had religious significance and would have been worn on a necklace by a prominent member of society."[1].

Ethnic groupsEdit

A substantial proportion of Ptolemaida's residents are Greek-speaking Pontic refugees from Asia Minor who first arrived in Macedonia during the late 1920's. Another major ethnic group in the city are Greek Vlachi. A small ethnic group who inhabit the city are ethnic Macedonians, sometimes referred to as "local natives" or "Slavomacedonians" by the Greeks.

Historical populationEdit

  • 1908
  • 1915
  • 1923 before population exchange

see also:Exchange of Greek and Turkish Populations

  • 1926 after population exchange :
Year Communal Population Change Municipal population Change
1981 22,109 - - -
1991 25,125 3,020/13.65% 32,775 -
2002 - - - -

Villages Edit

Villages were named (in Ottoman Times ):

Villages were named (in Ottoman Times ): are should be added article inthe wikipedia Edit

--3210 22:37, 21 December 2006 (UTC)

Maps Edit

Dosya:Kayılar el çizimi.jpg The name of places in Latin alfabet. Dosya:Kayılar Yunanca adları-1.jpg Dosya:Rumelia map.jpg

External linksEdit

See also:Edit

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. Şablon:Note Şablon:Note label Şablon:Note label Şablon:Note label Şablon hatası:başlık gerekiyor.


ar:قایلر az:kayılar el:Πτολεμαΐδα ro:Ptolemais sv:Ptolemaida mk:Птолемаида bg:Птолемаида nl:Ptolemaida af:Ptolemaida sq:Ptolemaidha nn:Ptolemaida it:Ptolemaida sr:Ptolemaida lt:Ptolemaida tr:Kayılar

Google map ve Kailar Edit

Kailaṟ- daha fazla bilgi » *Yol Tarifi

  • Yakın çevrede ara
  • diğer



Kailaras, Madya Pradeş- daha fazla bilgi » Hindistan *Yol Tarifi

  • Yakın çevrede ara
  • diğer

The 1911 Edition of Encyclopaedia Britannica about Yuruks, Kailars and KonariotesEdit

see link

The first Turkish immigration from Asia Minor took place under the Byzantine emperors before the conquest of the country. The first purely Turkish town, Yenije-Vardar, was founded on the ruins of Vardar in 1362. After the capture of Salonica (1430), a strong Turkish population was settled in the city, and similar colonies were founded in Monastir, Ochrida, Serres, Drama and other important places. In many of these towns half or more of the population is still Turkish. A series of military colonies were subsequently established at various points of strategic importance along the principal lines of communication. Before 1360 large numbers of nomad shepherds, or Yuruks, from the district of Konia, in Asia Minor, had settled in the country; their descendants are still known as Konariotes. Further immigration from this region took place from time to time up to the middle of the 18th century. After the establishment of the feudal system in 1397 many of the Seljuk noble families came over from Asia Minor; their descendants may be recognized among the beys or Moslem landowners in southern Macedonia . At the beginning of the 18th century the Turkish population was very considerable, but since that time it has continuously decreased. A low birth rate, the exhaustion of the male population by military service, and great mortality from epidemics, against which Moslem fatalism takes no pre-cautions, have brought about a decline which has latterly been hastened by emigration

The Turkish rural population is found in three principal groups:

The Byzantines retained the southern regions and Salonica, which temporarily fell into the hands of the Saracens in 904. With the exception of the 1 Also Alexander, Perdiccas, Philip, &c. maritime districts, the whole of Macedonia formed a portion of the empire of the Bulgarian tsar Simeon (893-927); the Bulgarian power declined after his death, but was revived in western Macedonia under the Shishman dynasty at Ochrida; Tsar Samuel (976-1014), the third ruler of that family, included in his dominions Uskiib, Veles, Vodena and Melnik. After his defeat by the emperor Basil II. in 1014 Greek domination was established for a century and a half. The Byzantine emperors endeavoured to confirm their positions by Asiatic colonization; Turkish immigrants, afterwards known as Vardariotes, the first of their race who appeared in Macedonia, were settled in the neighbourhood of Salonica in the 9th century; colonies of Uzes, Petchenegs and Kumans were introduced at various periods from the 11th to the 13th century. While Greeks and Bulgarians disputed the mastery of Macedonia the Vlachs, in the 10th century, established an independent state in the Pindus region, which, afterwards known as Great Walachia, continued to exist till the beginning of the 14th century. In 1185 southern Macedonia was exposed to a raid of the Normans under William of Sicily, who captured Salonica and massacred its inhabitants. After the taking of Constantinople in 1204 by the Franks of the fourth crusade, the Latin empire of Romania was formed and the feudal kingdom of Thessalonica was bestowed on Boniface, marquis of Montferrat; this was overthrown in 1222 by Theodore, despot of Epirus, a descendant of the imperial house of the Comneni, who styled himself emperor of Thessalonica and for some years ruled over all Macedonia. He was defeated and captured by the Bulgarians in 1230 and the remnant of his possessions, to which his son John succeeded, was absorbed in the empire of Nicaea in 1234. Bulgarian rule was now once more established in Macedonia under the powerful monarch Ivan Asen II. (1218-1241) whose dynasty, of Vlach origin, had been founded at Trnovo in 1186 after a revolt of the Vlachs and Bulgars against the Greeks. A period of decadence followed the extinction of the Asen dynasty in 1257; the Bulgarian power was overthrown by the Servians at Velbuzhd (1330), and Macedonia was included in the realm of the great Servian tsar Dushan (1331-1355) who fixed his capital at Uskiib. Dushan's empire fell to pieces after his death, and the anarchy which followed prepared the way for the advance of the Turks, to whom not only contending factions at Constantinople but Servian and Bulgarian princes alike made overtures.

Macedonia and Thrace were soon desolated by Turkish raids; when it was too late the Slavonic states combined against the invaders, but their forces, under the Servian tsar Lazar, were routed at Kossovo in 1389 by the sultan Murad I. Salonica and Larissa were captured in 1395 by Murad's son Bayezid, whose victory over Sigismund of Hungary at Nicopolis in 1396 sealed the fate of the peninsula. The towns in the Struma valley were yielded to the Turks by John VII. Palaeologus in 1424; Salonica was taken for the last time in 1428 by Murad II [6]-- 3210  (T) 05:31, 22 August 2007 (UTC)




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